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street

Singapore Street Photography – Day 6: Marina Bay


Singapore
Marina Bay Sands

The skydeck on top of the Marina Bay Sands is amazing, with its 150m long swimming pool and the observatory deck, is one of the most impressive building I’ve ever been on top. I’m generally scared of heights but this time the curiosity to be on top of the most expensive hotel property in the modern history overruled my fears and the experience was awesome.


Singapore
from the skydeck

Singapore
marina bay

Singapore
open water

Singapore
Infinity Pool

Singapore
Infinity Hat

I’ve never seen anything like the Infinity Pool before. 150m of curved edge, falling on top of Singapore Skyline. People are swimming at 191m above the street level in the longest elevated pool in the world. The pool is strictly reserved to the Marina Bay Sands Hotel guests so if you want to live this mind blowing experience, you have to reserve a room.


Luca Sartoni
Self Portrait at Infinity Pool

I had two dreams when I landed in Singapore: shooting street portraits in one of the most amazing cities in the world and swimming in the Infinity Pool at Marina Bay Sands Skypark. I’m very pleased to announce that I made both dreams come true therefore I can board my flight back to Vienna tonight without any major regret about my staying here.

(*) A very special thank you goes to the Marina Bay Sands social media and communication team that invited me to visit the skydeck. I found a very well prepared team with great skills and experience. Check out their blog, twitter account and youtube channel. It was awesome to get such a nice tour of the skypark, the opportunity to ask questions and discover more about this impressive property.

Check out the complete gallery on Flickr and the premium selection on 500px!

Categories
News street

Singapore Street Photography – Day 5: couples


sunbathing by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
sunbathing

Bull by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
bull

Behind by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
behind

Check out the complete gallery on Flickr and the premium selection on 500px!

Categories
News street

Singapore Street Photography – Day 4: Lisa and Simone


Lisa by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
Lisa


Simone by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
Simone

Today I spent my day with Lisa and Simone, my great friends and hosts here in Singapore.

Check out the complete gallery on Flickr and the premium selection on 500px!

Categories
News street

Singapore Street Photography – Day 3: Little India and Arab Street


Dry Food Seller by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
Dry Food Seller

Crossing by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
Crossing

Polo by Luca Sartoni (lucasartoni) on 500px.com
Polo

Little India and Arab Street

Today I went to Little India and if I thought that this city had a smaller personal space around people, I have to completely reconsider the theory. In Little India there was no personal space at all and after a while I had to get out and breath some fresh (better say open) air.

Arab Street was awesome because I had the great pleasure to talk and make friends with some of the local carpet sellers. I asked them to pose for me in front fo their shops and the results were great.

Check out the complete gallery on Flickr, the premium selection on 500px and stay tuned. More will come!

Categories
News street

Singapore Street Photography – Day 2 – Chinatown again


Singapore
Cobbler - Singapore, SG

Singapore
Reader - Singapore, SG

Singapore
Thai Boxe - Singapore, SG

Enjoy the full set on Flickr.

Categories
street

My first day of street photography in Singapore

Singapore

I landed yesterday in Singapore to visit my friends Lisa and Simone. I’ll be here for a week and beside my job I will spend a lot of time taking pictures in the street. Today was my first day and I went to Chinatown. In a few hours I found out three things about this awesome city:

Different perception of personal distance

Singapore
Studying martial arts I learned that every person feels a personal bubble around himself. When someone enters that bubble we feel awkward and we raise up our psychological defenses. The more dense the city, the smaller the bubble. For this reason getting really close to people, while taking pictures in the street, is very easy in Singapore.

Different relationship with food

Singapore
In chinatown the food is everywhere and saying hello to your live crab before his final trip to the kitchen is very common.

People are really open

Singapore
As soon as I raised up my camera to take pictures of his booth, this man started to dance for me and wanted to pose with his roasted duck. I’m so excited about the amazing adventures I’m going to have during the next days in here.

Full set of pictures on Flickr. Enjoy and stay tuned!

Categories
street

Amsterdam Street Photography Meetup

Today I had the pleasure to lead a workshop about street photography in Amsterdam. The meetup was organized by Irina from KGS Global.

Street Photography Meetup Amsterdam
Rain in Amsterdam

Let’s say that the weather was not on our side but we had some good fun.

I had the chance to share some of my tips on how to be creative, have fun and get some good picture to be proud about.

Creativity through constraints

Every time you feel a lack of creativity, give yourself a rule. Limits can help you to get creative, lern more and explore things that you would never try otherwise. For instance force yourself to shoot with a prime lens, or just use a specific focal length of your zoom lens. You can decide to spend the entire day at f2.8 or just shooting round objects.

Street Photography Meetup Amsterdam

Every time you narrow down your possibilities, you start to explore the niche and you will find new inspiration. Try out this trick, and let me know!

Forget your display

Even if you have a top camera, the LCD display sucks. I was really disappointed that even a super duper camera like the Leica M9-P had a pretty crappy display glued on their back. But why do we look at the display so often? To check our latest shot. We check the light, the colors, the composition, the exposure, etc etc. And then we take decisions. We decide to recompose the shot, to take another one, to try with another aperture, etc. So basically, we take decisions based on what we see on our display which, as mentioned before, is really bad in term of quality.

For this reason I strongly suggest to narrow down what the display is telling you: Shoot RAW and set your camera to BW. You will always be able to edit the pictures in full color but you visualize the picture in black and white. Then, if possible, put your histogram on.

This way you have all the information you need to take wise decisions for your next shot: composition and exposure. The only two things that you can really change straight away when you take pictures. Colors, white balance and contrast will be fixed later on your computer screen, that in the worst case scenario is at least a hundred times better in term of brightness and color balance.

Street Photography Meetup Amsterdam
shoot RAW + BW

Keep shooting

https://www.instagram.com/p/kzhaf/

Your camera is tougher than you think. Don’t worry about a few drops of water on it, you really need to get extremely wet to get troubles. Just take some plastic bags with you and keep on shooting even in the rain.

The full set of my pictures and the group pool are available on Flickr. Enjoy!

Categories
street

Getting closer – A day in Venice – part 2

My day in Venice was completely devoted to explore some limits of my photographic skills. The first study was about the gear I should carry around and as I wrote previously, it’s much better to focus on what you have rather on what you could have, switching camera or lens. This is also true when you want to buy some new stuff. Are you sure you are limited by the lack of gear rather than by your lack of skills?

The second test I wanted to perform was about my confidence taking close-ups of perfect strangers on the street. This time the lens mattered a lot because the smaller the focal length, the closer you have to get. Let’s start with a 85mm lens. The easiest lens of the ones I had.

Fully manual close-ups

My challenge was pretty tough because I was taking head shots with a Nikkor 85mm f1.8 fully manual. No light metering and no AF. It means that to perform a proper shot you really need to be prepared. No time for metering, just focusing, therefore the metering has to be done before. It requires a bit of experience but it’s not so difficult. Manual focusing is a bit trickier but the D90 has a manual focus assistant and a green light turns on when the AF point is focused. Unfortunately it’s not so easy to rely on a very small assistant like that when your subject is not posing for you and you have to catch the moment. The key for success is practice, practice, practice.


Venezia
Nikon D90 - 85mm - ISO 400 - f2.8 - 1/250


Venezia
Nikon D90 - 85mm - ISO 400 - f2.8 - 1/250


Venezia
Nikon D90 - 85mm - ISO 400 - f2.8 - 1/125

In the next blogposts I’ll show you the same kind of experience but with shorter lenses: 50mm and 23mm. I will also tell about my rules of engament, stay tuned!

The full set of pictures is available on Flickr and your feedback is more than welcome!

Categories
street

Shooting in the street – A day in Venice – part 1

Yesterday I spent the day in Venice with my friend Giorgio. Despite the fact that my hometown is just 150km far from one of the most amazing cities in the world, I hadn’t gone to Venice since I was a teenager.

The weather was not too bad, considering it was the second of january, it was freezing cold but not too rainy. It was cloudy, therefore the light was perfect for taking portraits in the narrow streets of the city center, and so I did.

I planned to use only two setups: Nikon D90+85mm f1.8 MF for close-ups and Fujifilm Finepix X100 for wider shots. I also had my Nikkor 50mm f1.4G with me, you know, just in case…

forget the gear and be flexible

The main trap when you have two cameras/setup or many lenses with you is to adapt your setup to the surroundings. It’s ok if you are shooting landscapes or nature. You put on your wide lens for a gorgeous sunset or you go telephoto for details. Same story if you are shooting with a model. You have time to adapt your gear to the light and the subject.

After the first hour I realized that I was spending too much time thinking about which camera was fitting the scene, rather than clicking the shutter to catch the moment. So I decided to apply a simple timeboxing rule: 30 minutes with a camera, 30 minutes with the other camera, adapting myself to the gear and not the opposite.

The result was much better. I took amazing portraits and great landscapes because I was focusing on how to deliver the best shot with the camera I was holding, rather than switching from one camera to the other.

Here three shots, with different setups, but with the same spirit.


Venezia
Nikon D90 - 50mm - ISO 400 - f2.8 - 1/250

Venezia
Nikon D90 - 85mm - ISO 400 - f2.8 - 1/250

Venezia
Fujifilm Finepix X100 - 23mm - ISO 800 - f4.0 - 1/280

The full set of pictures is available on Flickr and stay tuned because more stuff is coming!

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